Tag Archives: Face Recognition Technology

Warning from a counter-terrorism expert

Australian airport security lack key skill to protect travellers: expert.

James Ried
The New Daily.
http://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2017/07/31/australian-airport-security-lack-skill-expert/

 

Mind the hype about AI and machine learning

I’m an advocate of the use and hiring of super-recognizers in various work roles and tasks that involve face memory or face recognition, but there are lots of people, some with personal interests and some without, who believe that technology can or will do a better job than humans can. The interesting articles below are probably worth a read if you have an interest in new technology relevant to face processing.

Hooker, Giles Machine learning: What journalists need to know. Sense About Science USA. March 22 2017.

http://www.senseaboutscienceusa.org/machine-learning-journalists-need-know/

Reese, Hope Top 10 AI failures of 2016. TechRepublic. December 2, 2016.

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/top-10-ai-failures-of-2016

 

Australia’s Face Verification Service

News that I didn’t have time to write about in November last year. The federal government of Australia plans to create a database of photo-id images. I’m not sure if this is just the National Facial Biometric Matching Capability renamed.

“A Face Identification Service (FIS) is expected to commence in 2017 to help determine the identity of unknown persons. It will be used for investigations of serious offences by specialist officers.”

Couldn’t be less detail or description or explanation in this statement.

https://www.ag.gov.au/RightsAndProtections/IdentitySecurity/Pages/Face-verification-service.aspx

https://www.itnews.com.au/news/australias-new-facial-verification-system-goes-live-441484

http://www.zdnet.com/article/australian-face-verification-service-starts-with-citizenship-imagery/

 

Interesting questions and serious concerns

Revell, Timothy Concerns as face recognition tech used to ‘identify’ criminals. New Scientist. December 1st 2016.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2114900-concerns-as-face-recognition-tech-used-to-identify-criminals/

Garvie, Clare, Bedoya, Alvaro and Frankle, Jonathan The perpetual line-up: unregulated police face recognition in America. Center on Privacy & Technology at Georgetown Law. OCTOBER 18th 2016.

https://www.perpetuallineup.org/

Is there really a criminal face? I don’t think the research discussed in the New Scientist article settles the debate by any means, but at least the controversial idea is opened up for investigation. If there is one my guess is that it is a look that coincides with the Australian face (every race and nation has a distinctive averaged facial type, apparently). European colonisation of Australia began as a penal colony and thus a good part of the white genetics of Australians arrived in this country through people identified as criminals. My best guess is that the crim face has a large straight nose, thin lips and puffy, small eyes. I’d guess this unattractive face could in itself be a social and economic disadvantage, or could be symptomatic of a phenotype that includes some degree of intellectual impairment. I think if there is a crim face it might have little to do with personality but a lot to do with disadvantage, but this is all speculation.

I think it is worth noting that claims made in the print version of this article about supposed advantages of AI over humans in face recognition skills such as identifying age, gender, ethnicity and tiredness by looking at faces presumably only apply to humans of average face recognition ability who maybe are not as exhaustively trained in these skills as the AI systems have been. One cannot compare human ability with AI in face recognition until appropriately trained super-recognizers (representing the top end of human ability) have been pitted against machines. I’m guessing this hasn’t been done.

Perhaps the most important part of this article is right at the end; “…the majority of US police departments using face recognition do little to ensure that the software is accurate.” That certainly is not good enough. Human super-recognizers have abilities that have been proven in scientific testing and also in practice in policing in the UK. Why do so many people persist in the assumption that machines must be better than humans in visual processing, in the face of an abundance of evidence? The link in the New Scientist article to the website of the researchers who have criticized the use of face recognition technology in law enforcement in the United States of America is worth a look for sure.

Chinese technology company using facial recognition technology

I think it is worth noting that this article and a similar one in a November issue of New Scientist have announced the commencement of use of this technology, rather than reviewing the performance of it or reporting the proven effectiveness of it. I’m skeptical.

Vincent , James Baidu swaps tickets for facial recognition in historic Chinese ‘water town’. Verge. November 17th 2016.
http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/17/13663084/baidu-facial-recognition-park-wuzhen

 

Face recognition technology fail

Revell, Timothy Glasses make face recognition tech think you’re Milla Jovovich. New Scientist. November 1st 2016.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2111041-glasses-make-face-recognition-tech-think-youre-milla-jovovich/

The trouble with police, large photograph databases and face recognition technology

Hodson, Hal Police mass face recognition in the US will net innocent people. New Scientist. October 20th 2016.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2109887-police-mass-face-recognition-in-the-us-will-net-innocent-people/

United States Government Accountability Office Face Recognition Technology: FBI Should Better Ensure Privacy and Accuracy. May 2016.

http://www.gao.gov/assets/680/677098.pdf

Had you assumed that hiring human super-recognizers to perform face recognition tasks would be less effective, less accurate and more open to bias than using technology? Think again.

Can you spot a sex offender or a terrorist just by looking at their face?

Adee, Sally Controversial software claims to tell personality from your face. New Scientist. May 27th 2016.

Similar story also in print: Issue 3076. June 4th 2016.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2090656-controversial-software-claims-to-tell-personality-from-your-face/

 

Facial recognition technology can be foiled with a photograph?

Marr, Chris Retinal scans and fingerprint checks: high tech or high risk? Science Network. April 22nd 2016.

http://www.sciencewa.net.au/topics/technology-a-innovation/item/4145-retinal-scans-and-fingerprint-checks-high-tech-or-high-risk#k2Container

 

Today’s news about The Capability

http://www.biometricupdate.com/201512/australian-govt-says-national-facial-biometric-system-will-maintain-privacy-safeguards

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-12-17/government’s-facial-recognition-system-sparks-privacy-concerns/7035980

http://www.abc.net.au/am/content/2015/s4374161.htm

http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/governments-facial-biometric-system-carries-a-low-risk-everyday-activities-could-be-tracked-20151216-glp7np.html