Monthly Archives: October 2016

IFLS article on supers

http://www.iflscience.com/brain/the-human-brain-has-a-super-capacity-to-recognise-faces-and-neuroscientists-psychologists-and-police-are-just-starting-to-figure-out-why/

Advertisements

Prosopagnosia report on Sunday Night on Australian commercial TV this weekend

Preview at link below. Apparently a face perception researcher from Western Australia will be featured in the report, as well as Australian celebrity prosopagnosic, pop science book author and science popularizer Dr Karl Kruszelnicki. This sounds good, but at the same time, this is pretty-much tabloid TV so I have limited expectations for this report. The promo looks sensationalist and misleading, with the use of the inaccurate term “face blindness” rather than prosopagnosia, along with misleading illustration of the concept with blanked-out faces in the promo, making it look as though prosopagnosia is a perceptual problem rather than a visual memory problem. I think it should be called face memory deficit disorder or something similar. I’ll be watching with interest anyway.

https://au.news.yahoo.com/sunday-night/video/watch/32997678/this-week-face-blindness/#page1

The trouble with police, large photograph databases and face recognition technology

Hodson, Hal Police mass face recognition in the US will net innocent people. New Scientist. October 20th 2016.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/2109887-police-mass-face-recognition-in-the-us-will-net-innocent-people/

United States Government Accountability Office Face Recognition Technology: FBI Should Better Ensure Privacy and Accuracy. May 2016.

http://www.gao.gov/assets/680/677098.pdf

Had you assumed that hiring human super-recognizers to perform face recognition tasks would be less effective, less accurate and more open to bias than using technology? Think again.

Face recognition testing has a long history

http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/apl/1/4/321/

https://archive.org/stream/journalappliedp03psycgoog/journalappliedp03psycgoog_djvu.txt

 

An oldie but a goodie

That was a lark!

I would never have guessed how one might convert some synaesthesia into an entertaining stage show, until I saw the talented and highly amusing Madame Lark today with our youngest, at the 2016 Awesome Festival in Perth. It looks like tomorrow is your last chance to catch her free show, which has a lot in common with the legendary Kransky Sisters, but certainly more cross-modal.

In case you are wondering how synaesthesia related to the show, there is a photo of a 2014 performance of Madame Lark at this blog article to illustrate, but ya had to be there.

cropped-madame