Tag Archives: Tattoo Designs

How capable is the National Facial Biometric Matching Capability?

Reporter: Margot O’Neill

It’s been described by the Government as its ‘latest security weapon’, but is the National Facial Biometric Matching Capability open to misuse? Lateline. ABC. September 9th 2015.

http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2015/s4309519.htm

It sounds like we are doing everything except using super-recognizers in Australia, which seems different to the approach used by police in the UK. Based on what I’ve read, I’m skeptical about the accuracy of this sort of technology.

Is face recognition (in conjunction with other forms of identification) once again the key to solving a crime mystery?

“I started to read about the shearers’ strike and I made a discovery. I found a photograph of the Strike Committee and there, standing up, in the middle is a person that I know was Joe Quinn. At this stage, he was calling himself Payne but I know him and recognise him as Joe Quinn from Gatton. I was so surprised to see that he was quite an influential member of the strike committee. And I remembered evidence that had been disregarded that Michael had a confrontation with a union official in a barber shop in north west Queensland and I wondered if the confrontation had been with this man, Joe Quinn.” – STEPHANIE BENNETT

This is a transcript from a story on the current affairs TV series Australian Story about a lady by the name of Stephanie Bennett who has spent years trying to solve the mystery of the horrific and vile Gatton murders. Bennett’s theory is that Quinn was the ringleader in the murders in company with others. I find her argument believable. Here are some more quotes from the transcript of the report:

“So Mum believes that Joe Quinn had been using aliases for years to evade the law. But he had a tattoo, he had some missing fingers, and he’d had a gunshot accident to the groin some years ago.” – ANGELA O’MALIA

“And under the name Adams, he is described as having one tattoo on his left forearm…” – STEPHANIE BENNETT

My knowledge of critical thinking and fallacies in decision-making tells me that questions need to be asked about this kind of evidence. Was the tattoo an exact match, visually or by description? How common was it for men at the time to have a tattoo on the left forearm, missing fingers or a gunshot wound to the groin? One needs to always consider base rates within the relevant population before deciding that some characteristic is unusual or abnormal or significant in some way. One must also ask how reliable was Bennett’s visual recognition of Quinn in the photo. But I guess such doubts might be unnecessary given the info that Quinn lost his job and was sent to jail for past crimes. One can only assume that this conviction was based on good evidence available at the time.

This interesting mystery is one of countless demonstrations of the importance of excellent face memory ability in solving crimes and identifying suspects, and it also demonstrates why we should never discourage the habit of criminal types to adorn their bodies with tattoos. In doing this they give a gift to police and detectives who are trying to identify persons of interest. Faces and tattoos are highly visible, permanent and distinctive features that can be used to identify people who are suspected of committing crimes. It is a wonder and a paradox that the section of society which has the most to lose from having a tattoo is the one that appears to have the most enthusiasm for getting them.

The story of this Australian murder mystery is also a reminder that criminals and psychopaths can and often do have charismatic and popular personalities. Regardless of whether or not Quinn was involved in the murders, it appears that he had been a leader in one of Australia’s most important industrial disputes, but also had a criminal past and a habit of using false names, and his dark past eventually caught up with him resulting in some time in prison. There is a popular image of the criminal psychopaths as loners, but it is more often the case that they are leaders.

Australian Story. When Blood Runs Cold – Transcript: Monday, 17 June , 2013. http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2012/s3783411.htm

No Quarter by Led Zeppelin

When I listen to this amazing song from the 1970s, the clever-sounding guitar riff looks like a tribal style design with slightly chaotically interwoven lines, like the type of thing that you might see tattooed onto the shoulder-blade of the bogan in front of you in a queue in a Centrelink office. Other versions of this song by other bands do not create this visual woven effect synaesthesia; they are not special like this piece of music. Jimmy Page knew what he was doing!

After thinking about this a bit, the tricky, complex-sounding guitar riff of the original version of this song by Led Zeppelin, which evokes visual synaesthesia of the tortuous, twisted lines goes well with the theme in the lyrics of the song. The lyrics describe a difficult, dangerous journey that could well fail. In contrast the version of this song by Tool has this guitar riff played to sound powerful and with timing that sounds dramatic rather than fiddly and difficult. In my opinion the way this riff is played in the Tool version is a mindless default to the standard powerful and dramatic heavy metal sound. Unfortunately, this is at odds with the theme in the lyrics of this song, and overall, the Tool version tells an entirely different story, a story that has already been told countless times before. I wish Tool hadn’t bothered.

Original Led Zeppelin version

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/RKOngTfTMs0?fs=1&hl=en_US

Tool version

http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/v/xzKWge4rLfI?fs=1&hl=en_US