Tag Archives: Science blogs

Looks like I’m not the only librarian

who has been screwed-over by Frontiers:

http://www.nature.com/news/controversial-website-that-lists-predatory-publishers-shuts-down-1.21328

Beall-listed Frontiers empire strikes back

http://www.nature.com/news/backlash-after-frontiers-journals-added-to-list-of-questionable-publishers-1.18639

 

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If I could justify the time……

If I had more time I would write a post about what I think is wrong with Dr Karl’s new book, which will probably sell like hot cakes this Christmas, but has one chapter which is seriously incomplete and out of date. If I could justify spending the time writing this blog for no financial return I might also write lengthy posts explaining more of my scientific ideas about synaesthesia, cognition and memory. But sadly, this blog has no funding and no sponsor and not much of a future. But you will always be able to read about Paris Hilton and Kim Karwhatshername on the internet.

Another super-recognizer blog – how did I overlook this?

I’m wondering why I haven’t come across this blog before. It could be something to do with completely non-standard terminology for superior face recognition. I’ve seen it spelt “superrecognizer”, “super recogniser”, “super-recognizer” and one recent journal paper uses the term “super-recognition”. Information retrieval chaos.

This blog is an interesting find, even if it included a modest couple of posts over a couple of years. Dave C believes that both his mother and himself are super-recognizers, and maybe even his father. So is super-recognition a developmental brain variation that runs in families, like synaesthesia and prosopagnosia? There are good reasons to suspect that this might be so. I definitely do have other synaesthetes in my immediate family, but I don’t know if there are any super-recognizers. There will always be a big question mark over one family member who is long-deceased. Two other aspects of the blog “Super Recogniser” are notable. I find the style of writing interesting and it reminds me a bit of my own written output. The style of his blog also has some similarities with mine, even though by all appearances it was started many months before I had even known of the concept of super-recognition. Dave C’s blog was established in May 2010, mine in December 2010. It appears that his originates from the UK. I’m living in Australia.

Super Recogniser http://super-recogniser.blogspot.com.au/

Mo Costandi worth reading

I find that the tweets of the UK science writer Mo Costandi are more worthwhile than most, as is his science blog at the Guardian newspaper.

Neurophilosophy.
blog by Mo Costandi
Guardian
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/neurophilosophy

@mocost
by Mo Costandi
Twitter
https://twitter.com/#!/mocost