Tag Archives: Genes and Faces

Observations on Beaumont children disappearance suspect – a diagnosis for Harry Phipps?

I’ve been watching coverage of the latest investigation of the disappearance of the Beaumont children in South Australia in 1966. Three physical characteristics of the suspect, the late wealthy and well-connected businessman Harry Phipps can be seen in photograps shown in recent reports: hypertelorism, gynecomastia and a narrow palate. These traits or disorders can be found in normal people but they are also associated with genetic disorders. It seems too much of a coincidence for a group of inborn disorder traits to be found in a murder suspect who is known to have been a violent paedophile, a long-term perpetrator of incest, a wife-beater, and a cross-dresser who displayed a “psychotic” temper. This certainly reads like a description of a person who was put together incorrectly, which is not an excuse for the vile criminal behaviour, but perhaps is a big step towards an explanation for Australia’s most tragic and terrible mystery.

I’m not sure how many children Phipps fathered, but I’ve only found mention of one, an estranged son who is no longer alive. If this is the only offspring of Phipps, possibly this is evidence of low fertility, which considered in combination with his tall, slim build, gynecomastia, cross-dressing and hypertelorism could be a symptom of the inborn but not inherited chromosomal disorder Klinefelter syndrome, which can be associated with an increased risk of psychosis, executive dysfunction and learning difficulties.

Another computer algorithm created to perform a face perception task that any person can do without even thinking

Wenz, John This Algorithm Guesses Your Biological Age Just by Scanning Your Face. Popular Mechanics. April 1st 2015.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/health/a14874/facial-scans-biological-age/

“For example, if a person appears to be considerably older than they really are, a doctor might look for something to explain that, whether it’s a genetic disorder or a lifestyle issue.”

I do not doubt the link between appearance of facial aging and genetic syndromes or drug addiction as I personally know of some real-life examples of both, and I don’t doubt that a good doctor should look for this in facial appearance and make appropriate investigations, but I do question why any doctor with normal eyesight and face perception would need a computer to do this, and I also question whether under the current “5 minute medicine” model of general practice in Australia, most doctors would have the time or the inclination to enquire about apparent accelerated physical aging in a patient.

I know of quite a long list of things that might accelerate the appearance of aging in the face, including at least one genetic disorder (I know of one family but do not know exactly which disorder), a drug addict lifestyle, smoking (which apparently destroys some vitamin and thus exposes cells to extra stress), and poorly controlled diabetes. There are probably many more things that can have this effect. Ask your doctor.

 

Interesting

This story about “information artist” Heather Dewey-Hagborg  creating art (face) portraits made based on genetic information from strangers is not new, but it is new to me and I think interesting

http://youtu.be/IIh9X-EZsjI

http://youtu.be/666Kq95xm1o

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn23677-artworks-highlight-legal-debate-over-abandoned-dna.html#.VP0QMvmUd8E

http://youtu.be/j2SjNSlRbvM

Poor Kenny

If you have ever doubted that simply looking at faces can be used to identify genetic disorders, consider case of Kenny the (very inbred) white tiger. Even though he is an entirely different species than us, we can tell just by looking at his face that something is seriously amiss. http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/kenny-white-tiger-reveals-price-inbreeding

In a perfect world every doctor would be a super-recognizer

In Western Australia a male infertility patient and his partner were given IVF, but it was later found that he had a genetic disorder that could have been passed on to the baby. I think if the doctor responsible for this omission had been a super-recognizer, it is possible that he or she might have spotted something in this patient’s face or appearance that would have given them the tip that a genetic anomaly might have been an issue. Perhaps one day a version of the Perth face-space project with adult’s faces might be developed to routinely and automatically screen or identify such patients.

Doctor fears IVF used too much. CATHY O’LEARY, MEDICAL EDITOR

The West Australian. July 20, 2013.

http://health.thewest.com.au/news/799/doctor-fears-ivf-used-too-much

Feature article on super-recognition in New Scientist magazine, and more interesting bits and bobs

(I’m going to finish writing this post later)

Unfortunately the interesting new article by Caroline Williams about super-recognizers is mostly behind a paywall, which we’ve got to expect. I like Ms Williams’ work. I’ve just finished reading her other recent feature article for New Scientist about Von Economo neurons, which are found in the anterior cingulate cortex and the fronto-insular cortex. I think one type of synaesthesia which I have experienced rarely and for a limited period might have involved Von Economo neurons. I refer to the time when I used to experience a pleasant flavour when being hugged by one of our kids, when they were little and sweet and cute and had a big smile. Kids grow up and they can turn quite sour in their teens. That’s life I guess. It looks like Williams’ interest in face recognition goes back a long way, as an article by her that appears to be about prosopagnosia from 2006 can be found in the archives of New Scientist.

Perhaps it is not entirely coincidental that today’s TV news has included a national and a state news story about riot investigations in which Australian police and security forces are using face recognition, perhaps super-recognizers, to try to identify participants or offenders. The riots were in some ways very different – one Sydney riot that broke out over the controversial Muslim-baiting movie, and the other riot was in some outer suburb of Perth with another teenage party that got out of control with the help of Facebook. No doubt both riots included many young and alienated people. In the report at the ABC’s 7.30 program linked to below at around 3.30 into the clip there’s a bit that seems to be hinting about police super-recognizers. On the Perth Seven News story there is a warning that the police will be painstakingly reviewing hours of footage or the riots to try to identify people. They’ll need to have a super-recognizer handy.

Williams, Caroline Face savers. New Scientist. 15 September 2012 no.2882 pages 36-39.   online title: ‘Super-recognisers’ have amazing memory for faces.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528821.500-superrecognisers-have-amazing-memory-for-faces.html

Coghlan, Andy Police could create image of suspect’s face from DNA. New Scientist. 14 September 2012.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22271-police-could-create-image-of-suspects-face-from-dna.html

Williams, Caroline Are these the brain cells that give us consciousness? New Scientist. 23 July 2012. no. 2874. p.33-35. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528741.600-are-these-the-brain-cells-that-give-us-consciousness.html

Williams, Caroline Living in a world without faces. New Scientist. 24 November 2006. no. 2579.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19225791.600-living-in-a-world-without-faces.html

Cooper, Hayden Text messages and terror connections inflame Muslim protests. 7.30. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Broadcast: 17/09/2012.  http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3592083.htm

Party riot fears. Seven News. 18 September 2012. http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/video/watch/d5538a22-a563-3239-9429-e330f7c58aab/party-riot-fears/