Tag Archives: 7.30 (TV show)

Is there a human sense of psychological and physical distress in others that operates below the level of consciousness?

I’ve just been watching the former Prime Minister of Australia Malcolm Turnbull being interviewed on the 7.30 news program. I was particularly struck by his revelation that during the period of his career following his gross misjudgement in the “Utegate” affair he was in a very dark emotional state, despite maintaining his usual polished and confident image. When Turnbull fell for the deception of an unhinged and ill public servant who claimed implausibibly that the very wealthy and ambitious leader of the party opposing Turnbull’s party had accepted an old utility truck as a political bribe, that destroyed my confidence in Turnbull as a leader, and we now know, it also wrecked his own self-image. As I marvelled at the contrast beteen the politician’s inner state and his exterior image, I was reminded of a baffling dream that I had when Turnbull was still a political leader.

I rarely remember my dreams, but this one was also remarkable for other reasons. In the dream I somehow percieved that Turnbull was in a dire state of unhappiness due to his work and this concerned me. His facial expression was sad but not extreme, so this was one of many examples of a dream in which I simply knew something by telepathy or unclear means. In my dream I said something like “Cheer up, it’s only a job”. Upon waking I was baffled that I even cared about this politician in my dream, as I deplored his party and never had much interest in him as an individual. I hadn’t recalled noticing any particular news or media coverage at the time suggesting a drop in this politician’s career satisfaction. After wondering what in the world had prompted this oddly vivid dream, it seemed to me that the dream was a manifestation of a basic human concern for others that operates independently of conscious rational judgements about another person’s character. Now that I know that possibly at the time of my dream I might have seen Turnbull on TV during the time when he was feeling secretly bleak, I’m left wondering whether I had unconsciously sensed something in his voice, appearance, words or manner that betrayed his real state, and this perception was explored in my dream. This wouldn’t be the first time that I apparently sensed stress and serious danger in a person I was not particularly close to.

When I was in my 20s I once got the idea into my head to write in a Christmas card a sincere hope that the recipient (not a close relative by any means) not suffer a heart attack. I thought twice about that choice of wording and asked my flat-mate if she thought it appropriate. She clearly thought I had lost my mind,  as any sensible person would, but still I felt genuine concern about this ambitious and busy person who I saw only occassionally, who always seemed to be bathed in sweat. Roughly a year later I recieved news of that person’s full recovery from a heart attack. A few years later I formed the opinion, based on what I am not sure, that one of my work supervisors, a kind person but not one who I felt was a friend, was headed for trouble due to trying to do too much in tackling the roles of mother of young children, wife, career-builder and property investor. Not long after that she came down with shingles, a nasty disease that can be triggered by stress. I’ll never know why I felt constantly concerned about a friend of one of our young adult offspring in the week before we were shocked by the terrible news of her suicide. I had only met this striking person a few times and we weren’t friends or close, but the day before we recieved the news I had been asking questions at work in the faint hope that there might be a job opportunity for her there. In hindsight, many other people would have known enough to be very concerned for her welfare, much more than I did, so I’m baffled as to how I apparently sensed imminent danger in the life of a person I barely knew and was not in direct contact with.

Maybe these anecdotes are all nothing more than unhappy coincidences that appear to be predictions when viewed in retrospect. Could I or anyone have altered fate? Even if it is possible to sense the approaching date when a friend or acquaintance will reach beyond their physical or psychological limits, I ask you, how do you save someone from themself?

https://iview.abc.net.au/show/malcolm-turnbull-the-7-30-interview

Young blue eyes….

After watching the American journalist Ronan Farrow, the son of actress Mia Farrow and supposedly the son of actor/director/creep Woody Allen, I must declare that there is no way in the wide, wide, world that Ronan Farrow is not the biological son of Frank Sinatra. Just look at those eyes! And the rest of his face, which I could happily look at for hours. He got genes for looking good from both biological parents. Life is not fair. Surely one doesn’t need to be a super-recogniser like me to see Sinatra when Farrow speaks?

I think Farrow also looks a bit like the blond actor from the TV series Starsky and Hutch, but that’s probably just a coincidental mix of similar attractive features and the blond hair. One American actor that Farrow does not look at all like is Woody Allen, and I think we can all agree, that’s a good thing.

https://www.abc.net.au/7.30/ronan-farrow-discusses-his-investigation-into/11605546

https://www.yourtango.com/2019328782/ronan-farrow-frank-sinatra-son

 

Report on the MONA synaesthesia show on Australian public broadcaster television

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-08-19/synaesthesia-festival-brings-classical-music-to-light-in-hobart/5681584

The value of CCTV questioned in Queensland

The value of CCTV in preventing crime has been questioned in Queensland following another tragic murder of a young person, which resonates with concerns about CCTV that I’ve aired at this blog in the past. CCTV might be a valuable tool in solving crimes, but everyone would much prefer that crimes be prevented or at least intercepted in a timely manner by police. The full video of this story will probably appear in a day or two at the 7.30 website.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-10/this-week-on-730-queensland/5382066?section=qld

Oh wow! My idea is being developed by the scientists, and they are scientists in my home town.

I’ve just noticed a story that has been run on the ABC programs 7.30 WA and State to State about researchers in Perth (scientists, doctors and an orthodontist), including some at PMH, who are creating a database of normal children’s faces to create the Perth face-space project, which appears to be a tool in development for the identification of the countless rare (genetic?) diseases which have characteristic facial appearance or facies. This knowledge can be shared globally, so this is Western Australia’s gift to the world. Wow!  We can’t make really good coffee in Perth, but we can do some interesting things here. There is already a research paper by Perth researchers and a Belgian researcher published in which this type of 3D face database method has been researched as a possible tool for monitoring and discriminating a group of rare metabolic diseases in which disease progression alters the facial appearance. I’m very excited to learn about this project because the idea of using face recognition to diagnose or identify rare diseases and rare genetic syndromes is an idea that has been obvious to me for many years, as a super-recognizer who is not only able to memorize faces very well, but is also able to compare and analyse faces with a degree of unconscious skill that is probably above average. I’m sure that most people have an awareness of the significance of facial appearance.

One important consideration needs to be factored into this kind of project – the definite possibility that the characteristic facial features that are being studied can be artificially altered before the patient ever goes near a face scanner or a medical face photographer. Many good parents spend a small fortune with othodontists getting their offspring’s teeth straightened and in doing this they are often erasing one of the signs of a genetic or developmental anomaly. Children can also be the subject of plastic surgery on the face, especially if they were born with a disfiguring facial defect.

One thing that I don’t think is mentioned in this news story is the fact that the studying of faces as an element of medical diagnosis is nothing new at all and does not require any fancy new technology or photographing of patients at all. This new project looks like it will be a great refinement of an idea, but I don’t think it will achieve anything that hasn’t already been done before using human abilities alone. Descriptions of rare diseases and genetic syndromes in medical textbooks or online info sources often feature photographs of patient’s faces that display characteristic features linked with the diseases and conditions. These features can also be described in detailed technical/medical language, much like detailed technical botanical descriptions of the parts of plant species using specialized terms (jargon). Doctors who specialize in genetics or related specialties know what this all means, and they should also have a high to super-recognizer ability to recognize facial phenotypes or at least have the ability to do visual image matching/comparison from the photographs. A specialist doctor with access to photographic resources and good eyes and sound and well-connected intra-cranial face processing hardware should be able to consider the patient’s face properly in a diagnostic process, no online database needed. But this process is labour-intensive, so I can see a use for an online face database.

3D Camera used to detect disease. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-04-26/3d-camera-used-to-detect-disease/4654822

Stefanie Kung, Mark Walters, Peter Claes, Jack Goldblatt, Peter Le Souef, and Gareth Baynam A Dysmorphometric Analysis to Investigate Facial Phenotypic Signatures as a Foundation for Non-invasive Monitoring of Lysosomal Storage Disorders. JIMD Reports. 2013; 8: 31–39. Published online 2012 June 10. doi: 10.1007/8904_2012_152  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3565667/

Saw, Samantha Defining normal. InkWire. April 17, 2014. http://inkwirenews.com.au/2014/04/17/defining-normal/

Feature article on super-recognition in New Scientist magazine, and more interesting bits and bobs

(I’m going to finish writing this post later)

Unfortunately the interesting new article by Caroline Williams about super-recognizers is mostly behind a paywall, which we’ve got to expect. I like Ms Williams’ work. I’ve just finished reading her other recent feature article for New Scientist about Von Economo neurons, which are found in the anterior cingulate cortex and the fronto-insular cortex. I think one type of synaesthesia which I have experienced rarely and for a limited period might have involved Von Economo neurons. I refer to the time when I used to experience a pleasant flavour when being hugged by one of our kids, when they were little and sweet and cute and had a big smile. Kids grow up and they can turn quite sour in their teens. That’s life I guess. It looks like Williams’ interest in face recognition goes back a long way, as an article by her that appears to be about prosopagnosia from 2006 can be found in the archives of New Scientist.

Perhaps it is not entirely coincidental that today’s TV news has included a national and a state news story about riot investigations in which Australian police and security forces are using face recognition, perhaps super-recognizers, to try to identify participants or offenders. The riots were in some ways very different – one Sydney riot that broke out over the controversial Muslim-baiting movie, and the other riot was in some outer suburb of Perth with another teenage party that got out of control with the help of Facebook. No doubt both riots included many young and alienated people. In the report at the ABC’s 7.30 program linked to below at around 3.30 into the clip there’s a bit that seems to be hinting about police super-recognizers. On the Perth Seven News story there is a warning that the police will be painstakingly reviewing hours of footage or the riots to try to identify people. They’ll need to have a super-recognizer handy.

Williams, Caroline Face savers. New Scientist. 15 September 2012 no.2882 pages 36-39.   online title: ‘Super-recognisers’ have amazing memory for faces.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528821.500-superrecognisers-have-amazing-memory-for-faces.html

Coghlan, Andy Police could create image of suspect’s face from DNA. New Scientist. 14 September 2012.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22271-police-could-create-image-of-suspects-face-from-dna.html

Williams, Caroline Are these the brain cells that give us consciousness? New Scientist. 23 July 2012. no. 2874. p.33-35. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21528741.600-are-these-the-brain-cells-that-give-us-consciousness.html

Williams, Caroline Living in a world without faces. New Scientist. 24 November 2006. no. 2579.  http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19225791.600-living-in-a-world-without-faces.html

Cooper, Hayden Text messages and terror connections inflame Muslim protests. 7.30. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Broadcast: 17/09/2012.  http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3592083.htm

Party riot fears. Seven News. 18 September 2012. http://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/video/watch/d5538a22-a563-3239-9429-e330f7c58aab/party-riot-fears/

Story on 7.30 tonight questions use of forensic facial recognition evidence in Australian courts

In tonight’s interesting and important story about the poor evidence-base of a lot of the forensic science and expert witnesses in Australian courts of law, Associate Professor Richard Kemp is interviewed, and he questions the scientific standards of people claiming the status of experts in the areas of forensic facial recognition and body mapping, as is applied to interpreting images photographed from CCTV and mobile phones.

I found this report particularly of interest, as I’ve been wondering if the abilities of super-recognizers might one day be given sufficient testing and scientific recognition that they (we?) might be able to work as expert witnesses in the courts. I realise that such experts would be different to the established concept of the legal expert witness in that it would not be a body of knowledge that the superrecogniser would offer, but a scientifically validated ability or talent. As long as the upper spectrum of human face recognition ability is superior to the performance of facial recognition technology, which it apparently currently is, the human face recognition specialist should still have more credibility before the law than the latest whiz-bang computer software.

CSI Effect questions forensic evidence. 7.30. Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Broadcast: 03/05/2012. Reporter: Deborah Cornwall http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3495060.htm